Boost screening to end anguish of cervical cancer, experts say

Boost screening to end anguish of cervical cancer, experts say

Britain could halt the disease provided clear targets and timelines are laid down, according to the charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. Its research found only a fifth of health professionals thought enough was being done to encourage teenagers to be vaccinated against the most common cause of the cancer – human papillomavirus. And just 16 percent were happy with efforts to improve screening – three in 10 women in England are not up to date. As Cervical Cancer Prevention Week started today, GP Dr Ellie Cannon said: “Ending cervical cancer should be a priority.” Progress to date has been too slow. GPs like myself are still seeing too many people miss their screening when called, which means they are in danger of being diagnosed late. This needs to change.” In the UK, cervical cancer claims two lives every day. Around 3,200 women are diagnosed each year.Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust said HPV self-sampling, which allows women to test for the virus at home, was a “top opportunity” to boost screening.In a trial, the NHS has sent test kits to 31,000 women in London areas with low smear test attendance.Saved by a drastic opAeron Smith had a radical hysterectomy in 2020, after being diagnosed with cervical cancer that had already spread to her lymph nodes.She booked a smear after seeing a story about reality TV star Jade Goody, who died of the disease in 2009. After further treatment, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, Aeron, 44, from Surrey, is now clear. She said: “Cancer doesn’t end after the treatment – ​​I’m now going through early menopause and also dealing with the loss of my fertility.” The idea that we could one day almost make this cancer disappear is incredible. ‘t we running after that opportunity and shouting about it?”